chilled cucumber walnut yogurt soup

Nik Sharma

Hey Friends, I’m a multi-award-winning and best-selling cookbook author and photographer.

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Summers are warm and depending on where you live, they can be excruciatingly hot and sometimes, even worse, accompanied by the dreaded “H” word…………. humidity! And as much as I like hot weather, humidity is another story, I’ll happily avoid it! But even in a hot and humid day, things can be fun and cool, especially if you can indulge in a bowl of this chilled walnut cucumber soup.

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I’ve made a chilled mint yogurt soup in the past but this time I wanted to make the soup full of earthy flavors yet every bit cooling so you feel refreshed with every spoonful. By adding a few toasted walnuts to the yogurt, the soup acquires a rich and creamy texture which makes it delicious. I couldn’t resist adding a little chili pepper but that is completely optional, if you don’t want a little hot, skip it or remove the seeds from the pepper.

chilled cucumber walnut yogurt soup
I added a few cups of Stonyfield’s organic plain low-fat yogurt to make this chilled soup, the yogurt by itself has a naturally fresh tangy flavor that really brought out the taste of the ingredients in the soup, making it the perfect summer soup.

 Note: Here’s some geeky biochemical science for you! Cucumbers can be slightly bitter and there a couple of ways to get rid of the naturally occurring compound called cucurbitacin that causes this taste. The amount of cucurbitacin can vary within cucumbers picked from the same plant, however in general, the bitter compound is present in the peels and green parts and it will be less in the center. To get rid of cucurbitacin, I use the method I learned at home, slice the ends of the cucumber off and keep the tips aside, then with the pointed tip of a knife prick a few random holes into the cut ends of the cucumbers. Now rub the exposed cut ends of the cucumber with the cut tips for a minute or two, a slight white foam will form. Rinse the foam off under cold running tap water, repeat this on the opposite exposed side. Once you’re done with this, peel and discard the skin and tips. 

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chilled cucumber walnut yogurt soup

yields: 2 servings

ingredients

3/4 cup toasted walnuts

1 cup peeled cucumber, diced (see note above on how to remove cucumber bitterness)

1 teaspoon kosher sea salt 

1/2 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground

1 green thai chili pepper (optional)

2 tablespoons lemon/lime juice, freshly squeezed (I used lime)

2 cups plain low-fat (non-fat) Stonyfield yogurt, chilled

a few chopped toasted walnuts for garnish

a little fresh dill/tarragon for garnish

a little walnut oil/extra virgin olive oil for garnish

1. Place all the ingredients from the walnuts to the yogurt in a blender and pulse until completely smooth and creamy. Taste and adjust the amount of salt and pepper if needed. You can also add a little water to the soup to adjust the consistency if needed.

2. Remove from blender, pour into chilled serving bowls. Garnish with a few toasted walnuts, dill/tarragon and a light drizzle of walnut/olive oil. Serve immediately. 

Disclaimer: I am honored to be a member of the Stonyfield Clean Plate Club. I received product or coupons for writing this post, but all opinions are my own.

11 Responses

  1. Oh, this is AMAZING! I’m so with you on the h-word — hahaha! I feel any level of dry heat is preferable to the insane humidity we can get on the East Coast sometimes.. lord. This soup looks fantastic. The extra earthy flavors you added sound just perfect (and I love the extra tidbit about cucurbitacin! My Saturday just got a little boost of knowledge!)

  2. This sounds so perfect. I just made a white gazpacho last week with almonds, and it just made my day. Im looking forward to trying this out tomorrow. To me it sounds like lime might be the preferable citrus to use. But what did you use for your recipe. I think they have distinct taste so I would like to know what your preference may be. Thanks for such an amazing recipe, and great insight to the cucumber, I always was told its the seeds that cause the bitterness. Thank you!

    1. Ooh yum, gazpacho with almonds sound creamy and delicious! I used a lime the first time I made the soup but I used a lemon the second time.

  3. Nik, this soup looks beyond scrumptious!! I love the added touch of toasted walnuts (the deep intellects of the nut family). Excellent biochemical tip…my inner science geek eats up random bits of trivia. 😀

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